Haute couture: the most voluminous fashion fantasy

Armani Privé haute couture Spring 2013

Armani Privé haute couture Spring 2013

Looking at the new haute couture collections for Spring 2013, presented in Paris this week, I've toned down my analytical voice in favour of letting my imagination flow with the most voluminous fashion fantasy. Still captivated by the Valentino: Master of Couture exhibition, I now believe haute couture is more important than ever because many designers who created ready-to-wear out of dreams are gone. Haute couture, with its undisputed beauty sustained by technical intricacy, is the last one transcending the mundane.

Haute couture consists of secrets whispered from generation to generation ... If, in ready-to-wear, a garment is manufactured according to standard sizes, the haute couture garment adapts to any imperfection in order to eliminate it.

– Yves Saint Laurent

7 Comments

  1. I totally agree with you...Haute Couture is the chance that we all have to witness true masterpieces in art that can change the way we look at clothes.
    XOXO

    Reply
    • Hi Martha, it's lovely to hear from you!

      Reply
  2. I was just wondering yesterday, that why would Haute Couture would still be important. Left that thought there to continue on it another time.

    But reading about it here, I believe yes one of the reasons could be for it's artistic value.... haute couture is fantasy and RTW ( specially when it trickles down to high fashion) is often run of the mill.

    The Creative Bent

    Reply
    • I'm always surprised when people negate that fashion is art. I could see why they wouldn't see ready-to-wear (i.e. mass production) as art, but with haute couture, there's no doubt.

      Reply
      • Yes I agree Haute Couture as art is obvious to even a lay man. In fact RTW on the cat walks is art in my eyes, but the moment I step into the Zara, Mango, Vero Moda etc. it all starts to look the same. Of course some designer is spending time creating the garments found there, but then its the similarity of everything that ceases to excite me. But then again, you can't refrain from buying from them altogether unless you have a lot of money. Just my view :)

        Reply
    • Simply put (in terms of creative bent's comment.), it allows the ateliers and designers to create what otherwise is simply unfeasible and unprofitable to do. Yes we work 15-hr days or with certain places on 24-hr shifts and are placing each bead/sequins on by hand or cutting and piecing bits together(And with everything being required to be handstitched/embroidered to perfection.)But having worked with some of these co. here in the city of lights, I can tell you we do what we do because we love our work and showing the world just how skillful/artistic we are(as petit mains). Think of it as living artistic installations that is slightly more accessible than a major Art show(the FIAC).

      Reply
  3. That Armani is gorgeous.

    Reply

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